A.M.T.G. G.G.
galleryofsmart:

Gallery of Smart - Curated Visuals
galleryofsmart:

Gallery of Smart - Curated Visuals
galleryofsmart:

Gallery of Smart - Curated Visuals
my-tumblrisbetterthanyours:

http://www.plueersmitt.com/
socialclaustrophobia:

Pablo Palazuelo (Spanish, 1916–2007)Sin título (exhibition poster Avant la lettre 82), 1963Lithography in colours, 64 × 41.5 cm (sheet: 76 × 53.5 cm), signed and numbered, Edition of 150
via artofoverwhelm
mpdrolet:

From Plastic Bag Landscapes
Vilde Rolfsen
sasj:

Geometric Shapes 13
vuls:

Michael Craig-Martin
Drawings of ‘4 Identical Boxes with Lids Reversed’ 1969
formulas-fatal-to-the-flesh:

worldofmesopotamia:

Sumerian treasures 

O__O
onsomething:

Alvar Aalto | Finlandia Hall - Carrara marble cladding
130186:

KTZ S/S 2015
ancient-mesoamerica:

Deer Head Mask
Veracruz, AD 600-900 (Late Classic)
Earthenware, Post-fire paint
Fanciful headdresses were an essential component of performance costumes because they were crucial to the dancers’ perceived transformation into the personage or spirit being in whose guise they performed. In Veracruz, figurines depicting warriors and a wide variety of performers often wear full-head masks, which can be removed to reveal the person inside, such as the amazingly detailed head-mask of a deer. Post-fire paint adorns the animal, with black-line curvilinear motifs on his long ear and bright blue-green pigment embellishing his upper lip. Large protuberances on his snout and the single horn atop his head suggest a composite zoomorph rather than a biologically accurate rendering. The deer was an important Mesoamerican food source, and its hide was used for a variety of purposes including the wrapping of ritual bundles and as leaves (pages) for screen-fold manuscripts which contained all manner of knowledge-from history to religious mythology to astrology and astronomy. The deer also was the animal spirit form of the mother of the seminal Mexican deity Quetzalcóatl and of the wife of the maize god among the Classic Maya.
http://art.thewalters.org/detail/80157
vuls:

Sam Francis
Untitled (SF65-680), 1965